Peacekeeping Contributor Profile: France

Peacekeeping Contributor Profile: France

Dr Thierry Tardy, EU Institute for Security Studies Last Updated: May 2016 Active Armed Forces[i] Helicopters Defense Budget Uniformed UN Peacekeepers UN Contribution Breakdown Other Significant Deployments 208,950 World Ranking (size): 22nd Army 111,650 Navy 36,050 (inc. 2,200 Strategic Nuclear Forces) Air Force 43,600 Other staffs 17,650 Paramilitary 103,400 Attack: 51 (+ 35 Anti-Submarine Warfare) Multi-role: 214 Transport: 204 (19 hvy; 150 med; 35 light) 2015: US$46.8bn ($1=0.9€) (1.93% of GDP)   2014: US$52.1bn (1.84% of GDP) 2013: US$52.3bn (1.86% of GDP) World Ranking (2015): 7th   93 (52 women) (29 Feb. 2016) Ranking: 30th (2nd largest contributor from EU and NATO after Italy) MINURSO 8 experts MINUSCA 12 (3 police, 9 troops) MINUSMA 38 (9 police, 29 troops) MINUSTAH 7 police MONUSCO 13 (8 police, 5 troops) UNIFIL 846 troops UNMIL 1 troop UNOCI 11 (5 police, 6 troops) UNTSO 1 expert As of Dec. 2015 Gulf of Aden (Chammal): 1 Destroyer with anti-ship missiles Mediterranean: Aircraft Carrier Group Mali (Barkhane): 1,680 Chad (Barkhane): 1,250 Niger (Barkhane): 350 Burkina Faso (Barkhane): 220 Central African Republic (Sangaris): 900 Côte d’Ivoire: 600 Defense Spending / Troop:[ii] $223,689  (compared to global average of approx. US$79,396; European average US$115,767) Part 1: Recent Trends Having been a large troop contributor to UN-led operations in the early 1990s, in the mid-1990s France underwent a policy shift to distance itself from UN missions. Through its permanent seat on the UN Security Council, France remained very active in shaping debates about UN peacekeeping but largely refrained from contributing to UN operations. In the 2000s, France started to return to UN peacekeeping in a select number of operations, notably...

Pledge Summary

United Nations Peacekeeping Pledges The demand for UN Peacekeeping is at an all time high. Member States and civil society continue to call on UN Peacekeeping to do more in increasingly inhospitable, volatile and dangerous environments. Today’s UN Peacekeeping missions are unprecedented in both the scale and scope of their mandates, facing increasingly dangerous situations where peacekeepers are being deployed where there is no peace to keep and face regular attack. In an effort to fill the capabilities gap, Member States were called to pledge necessary capabilities to ensure the success of UN peacekeeping missions. Summary of pledges made in 2017 In November 2017, pledges were made for peace operations in Vancouver, Canada. Below are the pledges reported at the Canadian Defense Ministerial. Detailed Pledges made in 2017 by Country   UN Member State Pledges (to) Belgium 2 NH90 helicopters, C-130 aircraft, ISTAR platoon, intelligence analysts Kazakhstan Infantry company, staff officers and military observers Thailand Engineering company assigned to UNMISS in 2018, field hospital, groundwater drilling, rapid deployment staff officers, organization of a multinational peacekeeping exercise, exchange of instructors and students with a number of countries, delivery of course on sustainable development approaches in peacekeeping Vietnam Replace a Level 2 UK country hospital in UNMISS in 2018, mine clearing engineering company Lithuania Force protection unit for MINUSMA Finland Special force unit, 20 police officers ( 20% female), capacity building in Africa, instruction and education, amphibious task unit, deployable laboratory for research on chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear weapons, continue to participate in UNIFIL beyond 2018 Ethiopia Infantry battalion, 2 formed police units Netherlands Deployment of long range reconnaissance group...

Peacekeeping Summits

Building Capacity for UN Peacekeeping   In an effort to increase the capacity of UN peacekeeping operations, two ministerial have been held where Member States pledged necessary capabilities to be used in UN peacekeeping operations. The third annual defense ministerial summit will be held in Vancouver in late 2017.     The 2017 Defence Ministerial (“The Vancouver Summit”) The 2017 UN Peacekeeping Defence Ministerial will be hosted by Canada, in Vancouver, November 14-15. The Ministerial was a follow-up to the Defense Ministerial in London, UK in September 2017, that had 70 countries attend.  The ministerial generated 30 new pledges for peacekeeping contributions. This meeting brought together 500 delegates from 70 Member States and was intended to generate and renew support for peacekeeping operations around the world. The themes of discussion for the two-day event was be 1) smart pledges 2) innovative training and capacity building 3) protection of those at risk 4) early warning and rapid deployment. The cross cutting themes are 1) gender 2) policing and 3) Francophone contributions. More information can be found at the official website: https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/campaigns/peacekeeping-defence-ministerial.html The 2016 Defence Ministerial (“The UK Summit”)     The UN Peacekeeping Defence Ministerial was hosted by the UK Secretary of State for Defence, Michael Fallon, in London from 7-8 September. It was co-hosted with Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Indonesia, Japan, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Rwanda, the United States, and Uruguay.   The Ministerial is a follow-up to the World Leaders’ Summit on Peacekeeping held in September 2015 that saw 54 countries make pledges towards peacekeeping. Since then, 20 new countries have joined and pledged additional contributions. This meeting brought together Defence...

Peacekeeping Contribution Profile: Russia

Author: Olga Abilova, International Peace Institute Last updated 31 October 2016 Active armed forces[i] Helicopters & fixed-wing transport Defense Budget UN Peacekeepers UN Contribution Breakdown Other Significant Deployments 798,000 World Ranking (size): 5 Army: 240,000 Navy: 148,000 Air: 145,000 + 34,000 Airborne Spec. Ops: 1,000 Command & Support 150,000 Paramilitary: 489,000 Attack helicopters: 296+ Transport: 532 (Heavy: 32, Medium: 500) EW: 54 TRG: 30 2015: $51.6bn (4.2% of GDP) 2014: $64.5bn (3.5% of GDP) 2013: $66.1bn (3.2% of GDP) World Ranking (defense spending): 5 98 (7 women) (31 Aug. 2016) Ranking: 68th MINURSO 16 experts MINUSTAH 9 police MONUSCO 29 (1 troop, 28 experts) UNFICYP 3 police UNISFA 1 expert UNMIK 1 police UNMIL 2 experts UNMISS 28 (22 police, 3 experts, 3 troops) UNOCI 4 experts UNTSO 5 experts OSCE Bosnia-Herzegovina 2 OSCE Kosovo 2 OSCE Ukraine 16 Armenia 3,300 Georgia 7,000 Kyrgyzstan 500 Moldova 1,500 (350 peacekeepers) Tajikistan 5,000 Ukraine: 20,000 (Crimea) 300+ (Donetsk/Luhansk) Defense Spending / Troop:[ii] US$63,991 (compared to global average of approximately US$79,369). Part 1: Recent Trends While the first Russian peacekeepers were sent to the Middle East in 1973, Moscow’s peacekeeping policies today are heavily influenced by its experiences deploying peacekeepers to the Balkans in the 1990s, as well as the operations Russian forces have led in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) territory, a regional organization consisting of ten former Soviet states.[3] The dissolution of the Soviet Union saw an increase in Russian interest in multilateral operations and contributions to UN peacekeeping (see Figure 1). While the increase was mostly tied to Russian contributions to UN missions in the Balkans, two in ten...

Peacekeeping Country Profile: Ukraine

Dr Kseniya Oksamytna, University of Warwick Updated August 2016 Active armed forces[1] Helicopters   Defense Budget UN Peacekeepers UN Contribution Breakdown Other Significant Deployments 204,000 World Ranking (size): 23rd Army 145,000 Navy 6,000 Air 45,000 Airborne 8,000     133 attack (+ 8 anti-submarine) 72 medium transport 1 multirole     2016: $4bn (5% of GDP) (estimated)[2] 2015: $3.9bn (4.34% of GDP) 2014: $3.4bn (2.59% of GDP) World Ranking (defense spending): 39   493 (6 women) (31 July 2016) Ranking: 42nd (4th in Europe after Italy, France and Spain) MONUSCO 270 (256 troops; 11 experts; 3 police) UNMIL 167 (162 troops; 3 experts) UNMISS 34 (1 troop; 3 experts; 30 police) UNOCI 6 (3 troops; 3 police) UNISFA 6 (2 troops; 4 experts) UNFICYP 8 (6 police, 2 troops) UNMIK 2 experts NATO KFOR: 33 NATO Resolute Support: 10 Joint Peacekeeping Forces Transnistria: 10     Defense Spending / Troop:[3] US$19,196 (compared to global average of approximately US$79,396)   Part 1: Recent Trends Ukraine first participated in UN peacekeeping operations several months after its 24 August 1991 independence when it deployed a battalion to UNPROFOR. Since then it has remained an active contributor to UN-led and UN-authorized operations, although its profile changed from a significant troop contributor to a provider of specialist equipment and associated expertise, such as helicopters and crews, in the mid-2000s. Until then, Ukraine was an important contributor of uniformed personnel (see Figure 1). In January 2001, for example, it was the 7th largest provider of military and police for UN operations. But these contributions declined during the presidency of Viktor Yushchenko (2005 – 2010) and increased only...
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